Man convicted in death of Edmonton Const. Ezio Faraone dies

EDMONTON – Global News has learned the man convicted of manslaughter in the death of Edmonton Police Service Const. Ezio Faraone is dead.

Sources confirm Albert Foulston was found dead Tuesday afternoon in a north Edmonton house from an apparent drug overdose.

On June 25, 1990, Jerry Crews and Foulston robbed a bank. When they encountered Faraone in an alley, Crews shot the officer. Crews was convicted of first-degree murder, robbery and weapons charges and was handed a life sentence without the possibility of parole for 25 years. Foulston was given 20 years for manslaughter and robbery.

Two years after his killing, a statue of Faraone was erected on the north side of the High Level Bridge in a park that bears his name.

Const. Ezio Faraone Park in downtown Edmonton.

Emily Mertz, Global News

New police recruits join current officers after annual run that ends at Ezio Faraone Park on June 25.

Kendra Slugoski, Global News

Flowers left in Ezio Faraone Park on Wednesday, June 10, 2015.

Emily Mertz, Global News

Const. Ezio Faraone Park in downtown Edmonton.

Emily Mertz, Global News

New police recruits join current officers after annual run that ends at Ezio Faraone Park on June 25.

Kendra Slugoski, Global News

Flowers left in Ezio Faraone Park on Wednesday, June 10, 2015.

Emily Mertz, Global News

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  • Albert Foulston ordered back to Alberta after breaching conditions

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    READ MORE: Cop killer Foulston back in jail, facing charges 

    Foulston was given statutory release in 2004 after serving two-thirds of his sentence.

    Wil Tonowski was in charge of the EPS’s high-risk offender behavioral assessment team at the time. Tonowski went to B.C. where Foulston was imprisoned. After nearly three hours of interviews he said he wasn’t encouraged that Foulston was willing to make a change in his life.

    “He had some insight but not enough, and certainly was not prepared to change his lifestyle and his habits,” Tonowski said and added the police service did make efforts to have Foulston moved out of their jurisdiction.

    Tonowski also looked back at records from the national parole board and Correctional Service Canada for Foulston’s behaviour while he was behind bars.

    “I was disappointed, but not terribly surprised, by how poorly he had done in all of the programs he was taking at the time.”

    In 2005, Foulston left the Matsqui Institute near Abbotsford, B.C., but breached the terms of his release within less than 24 hours by using drugs.

    In the years that followed, Foulston repeatedly violated terms of his release.

    He was also charged with numerous additional offences, including uttering threats, attempted house break, possession of a weapon, two breaches, impaired driving and possession of a stolen property, but all of the charges were withdrawn except one. He spent one day in jail for possession of a prohibited firearm.

    Foulston’s previous statutory release was revoked in January 2011. He had been caught driving without a licence three times and admitted to a police officer he had been drinking, a violation of his conditions. Foulston was also caught spending time with a known criminal. He was released from prison in August 2011 on a mandatory statutory release.

    READ MORE: Albert Foulston ordered back to Alberta after breaching conditions 

    The medical examiner had not completed a toxicology report as of Wednesday afternoon. That will need to be done before an official cause of death is released.

    Albert Foulston, convicted of manslaughter in the death of Edmonton Police Const. Ezio Faraone.

    File/Global News

    Albert Foulston, convicted of manslaughter in the death of Edmonton Police Const. Ezio Faraone.

    File/Global News

Trying to lose weight? Here’s how many calories you cut with each glass of water

You aim for eight glasses of water each day to stay hydrated but new research may give you another incentive to drink up: each extra glass of water may help you consume 68 fewer calories at mealtime. They say seven glasses of water is enough to help you cut up to 200 calories from your total daily intake.

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    In new research out of the University of Illinois, scientists say people who increase their water intake by one per cent ended up eating fewer calories, saturated fat, sugar, sodium and cholesterol.

    The water just had to be plain – from a tap, cooler, drinking fountain or bottle, according to Dr. Ruopeng An, a kinesiology and community heath professor at the university.

    “The impact of plain water intake on diet was similar across race, ethnicity, education and income levels and body weight status,” An said.

    “The finding indicates that it might be sufficient to design and deliver universal nutrition interventions and education campaigns that promote plain water consumption in replacement of beverages with calories,” he said.

    READ MORE: This simple change in school cafeterias could help kids lose weight

    The findings are based on the nutrition habits of more than 18,300 U.S. adults. Those who increased their intake of water by one, two or three cups daily reaped these benefits:

    One extra glass of water each day was tied to eating 68 fewer caloriesThree extra cups of water each day was tied to eating 205 fewer calories205 fewer calories each day could lead to losing about a half pound each weekSodium intake decreased by 78 to 235 milligrams depending on how much water they drankSugar intake decreased by five to 18 gramsCholesterol intake decreased by about 7 to 21 milligrams daily

    The researchers guess that drinking plain water helps to make you feel full so you tend to eat less. In the past, experts have suggested drinking a glass of water when hunger pangs strike in case you’re mistaking thirst for hunger. They also suggest drinking a glass of water before mealtime to tame your appetite.

    READ MORE: This food will make you feel fuller if you’re trying to lose weight

    Water also helps with digestion and flushing out toxins from your body.

    An calculated these figures by looking at how much water each person drank according to their daily water intake from food and drinks combined.

    On average, participants drank about 4.2 cups of plain water daily – that’s about 30 per cent of their total dietary water intake. They ate about 2,157 calories, including 125 calories from sugary drinks. Another 432 calories came from junk food.

    READ MORE: Fasting for weight loss? Here’s why scientists say it works long-term

    The decreases in calories, salt, sugar and fat were strongest in men and young and middle-aged adults. It could be because they eat more in general.

    An’s full findings were published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Read the study.

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Your Saskatchewan – Saskatoon: March 2016

Every day on the Evening News and News Hour Final, we feature a viewer submitted photo for Your Saskatchewan.

To submit a picture for Your Saskatchewan, email to [email protected]长沙夜网.

Pictures should be at least 920 pixels wide and in jpeg format.

GALLERY: Your Saskatchewan February 2015

March 1: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Faye Campbell of Fjord horses near Foam Lake.

Faye Campbell / Viewer Supplied

March 2: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Melanie Gray south of Humboldt.

Melanie Gray / Viewer Supplied

March 3: This Your Saskatchewan picture was taken by Rob Venn in Prince Albert.

Rob Venn / Viewer Submitted

March 4: Nadine Gurski took this Your Saskatchewan photo of a gathering of Cedar Waxwings in Saskatoon.

Nadine Gurski / Your Saskatchewan

March 5: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Bob Green in Saskatoon.

Bob Green / Viewer Supplied

March 6: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Nanoo Gardiner at Lac la Plonge.

Nanoo Gardiner / Viewer Supplied

March 7: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Brock Shearer in Saskatoon.

Brock Shearer / Viewer Supplied

March 8: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Tiffany Rohel at Little Bear Lake.

Tiffany Rohel / Viewer Supplied

March 9: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Garfield MacGillivray of this redpoll at Quill Lake.

Garfield MacGillivray / Viewer Supplied

March 10: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Carol Langenberger of a white-tailed deer in Hudson Bay.

Carol Langenberger / Viewer Supplied

March 11: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Heino Døssing on the icy shores of the South Saskatchewan River in Saskatoon.

Heino Døssing / Viewer Supplied

March 12: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Dorothy Caisse at Île-à-la-Crosse.

Dorothy Caisse / Viewer Supplied

March 13: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Ian Robertson of a grain elevator at Totzke.

Ian Robertson / Viewer Supplied

March 14: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Teagon and Bryor Polsfut in Biggar of their cat enjoying a warm wool blanket.

Teagon and Bryor Polsfut / Viewer Submitted

March 15: Clarence Rye took this Your Saskatchewan photo of a barred owl sunning itself Sunday afternoon at Brightsand Lake.

Clarence Rye / Viewer Submitted

March 16: Chris snapped this Your Saskatchewan photo in Glaslyn, where 12 cm of snow has come down over the past few days.

Chris / Viewer Submitted

March 17: This Your Saskatchewan photo of the northern lights was taken by Notanee Bourassa north of Regina.

Notanee Bourassa / Viewer Submitted

March 18: This Your Saskatchewan photo of a robin was taken by Jody Diakow in Saskatoon.

Jody Diakow / Viewer Supplied

March 19: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Kaitlin Reade of Charlie saying happy St. Paddy’s Day from Cando.

Kaitlin Reade / Viewer Supplied

March 20: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Samantha Keri of the only remaining span of Saskatoon’s Traffic Bridge.

Samantha Keri / Viewer Supplied

March 21: This Your Saskatchewan photo of a snowy owl was snapped by Faye Campbell at Foam Lake.

Faye Campbell / Viewer Submitted

March 22: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Jenine Boser of her Alaskan malamute in Regina’s fresh snow.

Jenine Boser / Viewer Submitted

March 23: Len took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Watrous just before the snow started falling.

Len / Viewer Submitted

March 24: This Your Saskatchewan photo was snapped in Dalmeny by Carol Langenberger.

Carol Langenberger / Viewer Submitted

March 25: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Arthur Rachul on Highway 41 near Alvena.

Arthur Rachul

March 26: Heino Døssing took this Your Saskatchewan photo in Saskatoon of the South Saskatchewan River.

Heino Døssing / Viewer Submitted

March 27: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Marcea Malinowski in Aberdeen of a local fundraising idea.

Marcea Malinowski / Viewer Submitted

March 28: The Easter snow bunny visited the Nowoselski family farm near Colonsay as captured in this Your Saskatchewan photo.

Jessica Sunderland / Viewer Submitted

March 29: This Your Saskatchewan photo was taken by Global’s Leena Latafat high above the city in the Saskatoon Police Service’s Air Support Unit aircraft.

Leena Latafat / Global News

March 30: This Your Saskatchewan photo of an Aberdeen fundraiser was taken by Stephanie Strain.

Stephanie Strain / Viewer Submitted

March 31: Valerie Horner took this Your Saskatchewan photo of the auroras near Prince Albert.

Valerie Horner / Viewer Submitted


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Latvians honour WWII Nazi allies in Legionnaires Day memorials

Over 1,000 Latvians commemorated Nazi-affiliated World War II soldiers on Wednesday, while police stepped up security to prevent violence from erupting between participants and ethnic Russians, who are a minority in the country.

Many Latvians consider March 16, or Legionnaires Day, an opportunity to commemorate war veterans, while Russians see it as an attempt to glorify fascism and whitewash a black chapter in Latvia’s history.

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    Latvia, which gained its independence following World War I, was occupied by the Soviet Union in 1940, then by Nazi Germany a year later, and again by the Soviets in 1944.

    The country restored its independence in 1991, after nearly five decades of Soviet occupation, in the wake of the Soviet collapse.

    About 250,000 Latvians fought alongside either the Germans or the Soviets, with around 150,000 Latvians losing their lives in the fighting.

    Nearly 80,000 Jews, or 90 percent of Latvia’s pre-war Jewish population, were killed between 1941-42, two years before the formation of the Latvian Waffen SS unit, which some Latvians claim as proof the unit couldn’t have played a role in the Holocaust.

    Many Latvians honour war veterans on Legionnaires Day, but ethnic Russians – who account for about one-third of Latvia’s 2.3 million population – see it as glorifying fascism.

    On Wednesday, the Latvians walked from a cathedral in downtown Riga, the nation’s capital, to lay flowers at the nearby Freedom Monument, where they were met by a few dozen anti-fascist demonstrators.

    The opposing protesters who gathered at a nearby park behind police barricades were both from Germany and Latvia’s Russian-speaking minority.

    Nirds, a protester from Berlin, said it was “unbelievable” and “a scandal” that the people serving in SS legions were remembered as heroes.

    One person, British independent journalist Graham Phillips, was detained following a confrontation with Estonian politician, Jaak Madison.

‘Bizarre’ child abduction attempt at High Park never happened: police

TORONTO —; Police say an investigation into a “bizarre” alleged child abduction attempt at High Park has revealed it was simply a misunderstanding.

A post on a local parents’ Facebook page on the weekend described an alleged abduction incident involving a woman who was seen with a child when the boy’s father confronted her.

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“They lost sight of their son for a minute and then couldn’t locate him in the playground area. The dad had the foresight to run out to the parking lot and saw their (almost) 4yr old son being dragged by the wrist by a strange woman,” the post read, adding the woman was “trying to pretend that the father was the abductor.”

But according to police, that never happened.

READ MORE: Woman sought in ‘bizarre’ attempted child abduction at High Park playground: police

On Tuesday, police announced they were looking for a person of interest in the case, and said Wednesday they had spoken to her and determined that no abduction attempt took place. The investigation is closed.

Local Councillor Sarah Doucette explained in a Facebook post that police told her a “Good Samaritan” had picked up the child after seeing him crying, and was walking around looking for his parents before being approached by the father.

“After a full investigation is appears that the child was crying after falling in the playground,” she wrote.

“The child is safe, the ‘suspect’ is cleared. I think this is a good reminder to parents when your children are playing in a park to always keep an eye on them. If they fall and are crying some concerned person may help them up.”

Calgary researchers looking for young cancer survivors for sleep study

CALGARY – Researchers with Alberta Health Services and the University of Calgary are looking for children between the ages of eight and 18 who have had leukemia, as well as healthy kids, to participate in a sleep study.“Sleeping well is critical for children’s cognitive, physical and social development,” Dr. Lianne Tomfohr-Madsen, a researcher with the Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, said in a release.

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    “Many people will occasionally experience difficulties falling asleep but, when it happens regularly, it can seriously impact health and quality of life.”Researchers are hoping to develop therapies to help cancer survivors and their families sleep better after they’ve returned home from hospital.According to Dr. Fiona Schulte, an AHS psychologist and co-investigator in the study, stress often keeps both children and their parents awake.“Parents and children often have fears about monitoring the child’s condition when they return home. That anxiety turns bedtime into a challenge and may lead to a cycle of waking up in the middle of the night.”READ MORE: Program helps childhood cancer survivors overcome learning deficits Study participants will be asked to fill out a series of questionnaires, keep a sleep diary and wear a sleep monitoring device every night for seven days. For more information, visit 长沙夜生活familysleepstudy长沙桑拿 or call 403-220-5086.

IN PHOTOS: Syrian refugee children fear for future 5 years into civil war

MAFRAQ, Jordan — About half of the 4.8 million Syrians who fled their homeland are children, and some of the most vulnerable live in dozens of makeshift tent camps, including in Jordan, which has taken in close to 640,000 refugees.

Children in these camps near the northern Jordanian city of Mafraq say they miss their old lives in Syria, especially going to school.

In this Friday, March 11, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee girl Mona Emad, 5, from Hassakeh, Syria, poses for a picture at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

“I used to go to the school back in Hama,” Rakan Raslan, 11, said of his hometown in western Syria. “I used to have friends there. Our home was destroyed in the war and we had to flee to Jordan.”

Rakan said that without an education, his future is in doubt. “The best I can become is a driver,” he said.

In this Friday, March 11, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee girl Zahra Mahmoud, 5, from Deir el-Zour, Syria, poses for a picture at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

Yasmeen Mohammed, 11, whose family fled the town of Eastern Ghouta near the Syrian capital, Damascus, said she misses her old life. “All I want is to go back to my school in Syria and see my friends,” she said.

The U.N. agency for children said in a report this week that close to 3 million Syrian children are not in school as a result of the conflict, including some 700,000 refugee children.

In this Monday, March 14, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee boy Hammad Khadir, 3, from Hassakeh, Syria, poses for a picture at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

The conflict, which entered its sixth year this week, has killed more than 250,000 people in Syria and displaced close to half the pre-war population of 23 million.

In Jordan, only about 100,000 refugees live in three recognized refugee camps and the rest are scattered across the country. Residents of informal tent camps say they can’t afford rent in Jordanian communities or they want to be close to jobs on farms.

In this Sunday, March 13, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee boy Mohammed Bandar, 12, from Hama, Syria, poses for a picture at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

Raddah So’od, 48, a mother of five, said she arrived in Jordan two years ago, after fleeing the northern Syrian town of Hassakeh. “We left our home due to shelling and bombing,” she said. “My children’s school was bombed, too. There is nothing left for us there.”

In this Saturday, March 12, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee girl Mariam Aloush, 8, from Homs, Syria, poses for a picture at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

But in Jordan, prospects for the future are dim.

“We were forced to leave Syria, fearing for our children’s lives,” said Bandar al-Humaidy, 42, a father of 13 from Hama. Al-Humaidy now works on a farm near his makeshift tent camp.

In this Saturday, March 12, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee boy Rakan Raslan, 11, from Hama, Syria, poses for a picture at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

“I dream of the day that all this bloodshed will stop and we will go back to our homeland and be able to protect our children and offer them peace and education,” he said.

In this Sunday, March 13, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee girl Amna Zughayar, 9, from Deir el-Zour, Syria, poses for a picture at an informal tented settlement near the Syrian border on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan.

AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen

Here is a series of portraits of children in the tent settlements by Muhammed Muheisen, The Associated Press’ chief photographer for the Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan.

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Linda Cochrane makes history by being named Edmonton city manager

EDMONTON – After an international search for candidates, the City of Edmonton announced Wednesday Linda Cochrane will permanently take over the role as city manager.

Cochrane becomes the first woman to hold the role in Edmonton.

“It’s a very emotional day,” she said. “This is right up there for me as one of the most important things with my career that’s ever happened so I’m over the moon.”

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    Cochrane started working for the City of Edmonton in 1982. She’s been the general manager of the Community Services branch since 2006. As acting manager, she looks forward to “helping people realize their potential as city employees and helping council make the best decisions they can.”

    “I have a huge respect for the office of city council. I have a huge respect for the work that the corporate leadership team does,” she said. “I think I just want to be a dialogue facilitator so that the right things can be debated and the right conclusions can be arrived at.”

    Cochrane was named acting city manager in September 2015 when former city manager Simon Farbrother was fired from the position.

    Perhaps Cochrane’s most public moment in the last six months was in September when she jumped in to calm down dozens of local taxi drivers who staged an angry protest inside city council chambers.

    “The cabbie whisperer incident was one of those moments where I think a number of us looked and said, ‘That might be the next city manager,’” Mayor Don Iveson said.

    “If for no other reason that first, she was fearless to wade into the crowd and second, her calmness under pressure, her ability to be able to bring people back to dialogue – those are incredibly valuable skills.”

    READ MORE: Acting city manager calms the crowd after Edmonton taxi drivers break out in angry protest at city hall

    Beyond her ability to calm a crowd, Iveson said Cochrane has really impressed council over the past six months with her leadership skills.

    “She is brilliant and she is persuasive and she’s compassionate. And the combination of all of those things is what makes her an excellent leader.”

    Iveson said well over 100 formal applications were filed for the position from people across Canada and the United States. Cochrane is on a three-year contract with options to renew.

    The former city manager was hired in 2010. Farbrother helped lead the city through the downtown arena deal and the closure of the City Centre Airport.

    In September, Iveson said letting Farbrother go was not the result of any one project. However, city councillor Mike Nickel said he had lost confidence in Farbrother following the fall 2015 release of an audit report into the Metro LRT project.

    Cochrane is on a three-year contract with options to renew. Her salary has not yet been released.

    “I just got the best job in the world and I’m looking forward so much to working with all of you and working with our staff and working with council.”

Reality check: Is securing a seat on the UN Security Council necessary for Canada?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau began a two-day trip to New York City on Wednesday, and kicked things off with what will likely prove to be the centerpiece of his visit to the United Nations.

The prime minister confirmed that Canada will seek to re-join the powerful UN Security Council after failing — for the first time ever — to secure a seat around the table in 2010.

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The upcoming bid for a two-year term starting in 2021 is part of a broader rapprochement between Canada and the United Nations that began with Trudeau welcoming UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to Ottawa in February.

Observers have noted that the warming trend may be politically advantageous for Trudeau as he attempts to position himself as a champion of UN priorities like refugee resettlement, tackling climate change and stabilizing the situation in the Middle East.

READ MORE: Trudeau at UN promotes parental leave for fathers, gender parity

But beyond the politics, what, if anything, would a seat on the Security Council really achieve for Canada?

WATCH: Canada lost its last bid for a seat on the UN Security Council in 2010, something Justin Trudeau is looking to change with a trip to New York. Jacques Bourbeau reports.

According to Paul Heinbecker, who served as Canada’s UN ambassador during a period when it sat on the Security Council in the early 2000s, membership will allow Ottawa to influence policy at a high level, and that can be critical when dealing with health emergencies like the Ebola crisis, or mass refugee migrations.

“Canadians are looking at the world now and they’re seeing a lot of upset, a lot of instability, a lot of risk that they didn’t think that they faced before from terrorism,” said Heinbecker.

“These things come to your doorstep … so I think it’s very important that we have the opportunity to influence events.”

Colin Robertson, another former Canadian diplomat and now vice president at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, agreed with that assessment.

“If you think of, say, the House of Commons, you move from the back-bench to sitting in the cabinet. The Security Council is essentially the cabinet for the United Nations,” Robertson said.

Canada is also one of the major beneficiaries of stable international trade, added Robertson, and by securing a seat, the country “can take an active role in helping to create and preserve that system. Instead of being a watcher, we would become an active participant.”

Additionally, membership on the council fits in with the longstanding tradition of having Canada at the table, Robertson noted, and that’s not as small a consideration as some might think.

“It’s part of what our self-identity is about, more so than other places. Britain and France have long histories, this country doesn’t have a long history. But the history we do have is, in part, as a player on the international scene.”

Conservatives will support bid

Conservative foreign affairs critic Peter Kent said his party will support the Liberal government’s efforts to regain a seat on the Security Council in 2021, but “we would hope that the government doesn’t compromise the principled foreign policy positions that our government took, and which contributed in large part to our lack of success in 2010.”

The Conservatives have always contended that Canada lost out to Portugal because the Harper government took unpopular stands on gay rights in Africa, staunchly defended Israel and flagged human rights issues in countries like Sri Lanka.

“There were a number of countries who … in the end, on the day of the vote, those votes when elsewhere,” Kent said.

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